The outlet online sale 2021 Neuroscience of Intelligence (Cambridge Fundamentals of Neuroscience in Psychology) sale

The outlet online sale 2021 Neuroscience of Intelligence (Cambridge Fundamentals of Neuroscience in Psychology) sale

The outlet online sale 2021 Neuroscience of Intelligence (Cambridge Fundamentals of Neuroscience in Psychology) sale

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This book introduces new and provocative neuroscience research that advances our understanding of intelligence and the brain. Compelling evidence shows that genetics plays a more important role than environment as intelligence develops from childhood, and that intelligence test scores correspond strongly to specific features of the brain assessed with neuroimaging. In understandable language, Richard J. Haier explains cutting-edge techniques based on genetics, DNA, and imaging of brain connectivity and function. He dispels common misconceptions, such as the belief that IQ tests are biased or meaningless, and debunks simple interventions alleged to increase intelligence. Readers will learn about the real possibility of dramatically enhancing intelligence based on neuroscience findings and the positive implications this could have for education and social policy. The text also explores potential controversies surrounding neuro-poverty, neuro-socioeconomic status, and the morality of enhancing intelligence for everyone. Online resources, including additional visuals, animations, questions and links, reinforce the material.

Review

''Forty years of Haier’s research and thinking about the neuroscience of intelligence have been condensed into this captivating book. He consistently gets it right, even with tricky issues like genetics. It is an intelligent and honest book.'' Robert Plomin, King’s College London.

''An original, thought-provoking review of modern research on human intelligence from one of its pioneers.'' Aron K. Barbey, University of Illinois.

''Deftly presenting the latest insights from genetics and neuroimaging, Haier provides a brilliant exposition of the recent scientific insights into the biology of intelligence. Highly timely, clearly written, certainly a must-read for anyone interested in the neuroscience of intelligence.'' Danielle Posthuma, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam.

''The trek through the maze of recent work using the modern tools of neuroscience and molecular genetics will whet the appetite of aspiring young researchers. The author''s enthusiasm for the discoveries that lie ahead is infectious. Kudos.'' Thomas J. Bouchard Jr., Emeritus Professor of Psychology, University of Minnesota.

''Richard J. Haier invites us to a compelling journey across a century of highs and lows of intelligence research, settling old debates and fueling interesting questions for new generations to solve. From cognitive enhancement to models predicting IQ based on brain scans, the quest to define the neurobiological basis of human intelligence has never been more exciting.'' Emiliano Santarnecchi, Harvard Medical School.

''Loud voices have dismissed and derided the measurement of human intelligence differences, their partial origins in genetics, and their associations with brain structure and function. If they respect data, Haier''s book will quieten them. It''s interesting to think how slim a book with the title. The Neuroscience of Intelligence would have been not long ago, and how big it will be soon; Haier''s lively book is a finger-post showing the directions in which this important area is heading.'' Ian J. Deary, University of Edinburgh.

''The biology of few psychological differences is as well understood as that of intelligence. Richard J. Haier pioneered the field of intelligence, neuroscience, and he is still at its forefront. This book summarizes the impressive state the field has reached, and foreshadows what it might become.'' Lars Penke, Georg-August-Universitat, Gottingen, Germany.

''This text is welcome, needed and important to help those of us who wait for research findings to guide our clinical interventions.'' Laura Hill, Ohio State University.

''This book was overdue: a highly readable and inspiring account of cutting-edge research in neuroscience of human intelligence. Penned by Richard J. Haier, the eminent founder of this research field, the book is an excellent introduction for beginners and a valuable source of information for experts.'' Aljoscha Neubauer, University of Graz, Austria.

''This book is ‘A Personal Voyage through the Neuroscience of Intelligence’. Reading this wonderful volume ‘forces thinking,’ which can be said only about a very small fraction of books. Here the reader will find reasoned confidence on the exciting advances, waiting next door, regarding the neuroscience of intelligence and based on the author’s three basic laws: 1. No story about the brain is simple, 2. No one study is definitive, and 3. It takes many studies and many years to sort things out.'' Roberto Colom, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid.

''Richard J. Haier’s The Neuroscience of Intelligence is an excellent summary of the major progress made in the fields of psychology, genetics and cognitive neuroscience, expanding upon the groundbreaking work of ''The Bell Curve.'' He addresses the many misconceptions and myths that surround this important human capacity with a clear summary of the vast body of research now extending into the human brain and genome.'' Rex E. Jung, University of New Mexico.

''The Neuroscience of Intelligence is a compelling text that addresses a complex body of research (intelligence research) that has often been misinterpreted and manipulated by secondary and tertiary sources. This book is a must read for psychology and other social science students. Given the broad range of misinformation about intelligence testing, despite the academic and clinical need for that testing, it would be beneficial for this text to be widely read. It would serve as a great learning tool to teach undergraduate students about intelligence also how science and politics interact.'' Robert B. Perna, PsycCRITIQUES.

''An exceptional resource for any individual interested in a technically thorough but easy-to-digest compilation of the neuroscience of intelligence.'' Choice.

''The Neuroscience of Intelligence melds a century’s worth of psychometric with the most recent advances in genetics and neuroimaging to reveal the cutting edge of intelligence research. This book is an impressively broad review of the current state of the field that does not compromise on depth. It can serve as a crash course for budding researchers in the field while highlighting many exciting prospects for those already involved. The book is inspiring and enjoyable to read, and it is structured in a way that ''forces thinking'' while capturing the passion that Haier feels for this exciting field.'' Arseni Sitartchouk and Alan C. Evans, Intelligence.

''Dr Haier has compiled an impressive collection of scientific findings and arguments Nathaniel Barr, British Journal of Psychology.

Book Description

This unique book clearly explains genetic and neuroimaging research on intelligence and how neuroscience findings may lead to enhancing it.

About the Author

Richard J. Haier earned his PhD from The Johns Hopkins University and is Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Irvine. He pioneered the use of neuroimaging to study intelligence in 1988 and has given invited lectures at meetings sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the National Academy of Sciences, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the European Molecular Biology Organization, and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. In 2013, he created video lectures, ''The Intelligent Brain'', for The Great Courses. In 2016, he served as President of the International Society for Intelligence Research and became Editor-in-Chief of Intelligence.

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Top reviews from the United States

J. Wells
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A concise summary of the exciting state of intelligence research
Reviewed in the United States on January 24, 2018
What exactly is intelligence and how can intelligence possibly be measured and quantified? Is intelligence genetic or is it a product of environment and educational attainment? Are there really IQ differences between the sexes and ethnic groups? Can brain scans identify... See more
What exactly is intelligence and how can intelligence possibly be measured and quantified? Is intelligence genetic or is it a product of environment and educational attainment? Are there really IQ differences between the sexes and ethnic groups? Can brain scans identify intelligence at work? Can IQ really be boosted through intensive early education, breast feeding, listening to Mozart, or by taking supplements?

These questions and more are concisely answered head-on in this new book by Richard J. Haier, Professor Emeritus at UC Irvine, who has been on the forefront of intelligence research for over 40 years. As Haier closes in on the end of his long and distinguished career, he uses this book to summarize the current state of intelligence research and suggests that there is an exciting “golden age” of discovery that he foresees emerging in this field. The primary target audience is students of psychology and neuroscience, educators, and education policy makers.

Perhaps no field of study in psychology, let alone in the social sciences, is as misunderstood, misinterpreted, and misrepresented as is the study of intelligence. This being the case, Haier clearly states in the Preface that three laws govern this book:

1. No story about the brain is simple
2. No one study is definitive
3. It takes many years to sort out conflicting and inconsistent findings and establish a compelling weight of evidence

“Weight of evidence” is actually the key to this book and to understanding the state of intelligence science. Haier writes “If the weight of evidence changes for any of the topics covered, I will change my mind, and so should you.” He reminds the reader of this point throughout the book to underscore that outlier studies do not necessarily nullify prior data and that the complexity of the science makes it difficult to establish a weight of evidence on the basis just one or two studies.

The book is divided into 6 chapters, each ending with bullet point recaps of the main topics covered and some questions for review.

Chapter 1 covers what we know about intelligence and the weight of evidence
Chapter 2 covers nature vs. nurture and the genetics of intelligence
Chapter 3 covers the early brain scanning studies and their discoveries
Chapter 4 covers the current state of brain scanning and intelligence at work
Chapter 5 covers whether intelligence can be boosted
Chapter 6 covers new research into intelligence and what is on the horizon

Throughout the book, Haier consistently remains cautious, conservative, and measured in his presentation of the evidence and the conclusions drawn from it, and provides extensive citations to the major studies that have established the current weight of evidence.

Some major takeaways from this book are:

*General intelligence is indeed measurable to an accurate degree and it is the best predictor of one’s educational and economic success
*Intelligence is largely genetic - approximately 80% genetic by early adulthood
*Many genes are now being identified which are related to intelligence
*Intelligence does vary between ethnicities, but not so much between the sexes
*Brain scans are showing intelligence at work in greater detail than ever before, and physical differences in brain structures between higher and lower IQ subjects are being discovered
*Arthur Jensen’s controversial findings regarding IQ and education are largely validated by the current weight of evidence
*IQ is not permanently increased by early education, breast feeding, listening to Mozart, educational video games, or by taking cognitive supplements
*”Neuro-poverty” is a real phenomenon that has significant implications for education policy and how social welfare programs are designed

While the above takeaways are established by the weight of evidence, Haier does not shy away from presenting the studies which report conflicting data and discussing what those studies mean in terms of whether they are statistical outliers or the result of poorly designed studies and poor peer review.

The enthusiasm which Haier seems to infuse this book with is directed towards those just entering the field and the incredible discoveries that are sure to come in the next few decades with the improving scanning technology and the decoding of the genome. The possibility of applying these new discoveries to inventing methods of boosting intelligence for lower IQ people to help level the playing field is one of the major goals and benefits to society for the study of intelligence.

This book should be required reading for education policymakers who continue to approach disparate educational gaps, particularly by ethnicity, only as failures in educational bureaucracy, or worse, as a result of institutional racism. This book should also be required reading for students of the social sciences, particularly for Sociology students who are ostensibly studying a “science”, but are far too often indoctrinated into an ideological viewpoint that all differences in life outcomes are strictly due to one’s environment and cultural institutions.
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Graham H. Seibert
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Measurements of the brain corroborate IQ tests and genomics
Reviewed in the United States on July 1, 2019
Intelligence research traditionally focused on intelligence testing. It was one of the two fields on which the science of statistics was founded. Statistics analyzes correlations among variables. What Charles Spearman found 100 years ago was that children who did well on... See more
Intelligence research traditionally focused on intelligence testing. It was one of the two fields on which the science of statistics was founded. Statistics analyzes correlations among variables. What Charles Spearman found 100 years ago was that children who did well on tests of mathematical ability tended to do well on English, French, even musical ability. He posited that there was an underlying intelligence factor. He called it g, the general factor of intelligence, which related all measures of school ability.

Haier relates that history and agrees with it. However, this traditional psychometric approach ran into two difficulties about 50 years ago. First difficulty was that by 50 years ago they are had invented most of the optimal ways to operationalize the measurement of intelligence to put on pencil and paper tests . The second difficulty was that political liberals, for reasons of conscience having nothing to do with science, dismissed the whole thing. The whole field of intelligence research fell into bad odor. People would deny the reality of intelligence, claiming that the tests were biased, even that there was no such thing as intelligence – it was a meaningless idea.

Haier describes the science susequent to traditional psychometrics, following it in two directions. The first is genomics. Scientists have long known that intelligence was 80% heritable. That in itself should have been a refutation of the deniers, but they refused to accept the evidence. Genomic researchers are finding more and more specific alleles, genes, that seem to be related to intelligence. The frustrating thing is that there are thousands of them, and no individual gene seems to account for as even a significant fraction of 1% of intelligence. Nonetheless, that from that genomic side, they have pretty good theories as to how and how intelligence is passed on from parent to child.

The other area of research, Haier''s, has to do with measuring what''s going on in the brain. The tools to measure activity in the brain have become increasingly sophisticated over the past 30 years. The first one, pet scans, or proton emission tomography, required injecting radioactive substance into the brain. There, the radioactive substance with could then be what then are generate gamma rays that could be captured on a x-ray film in which show more or less where the harm injected material was traveling around in the brain. But primitive, but better than nothing. Next came MRIs, static MRIs, they gave a pretty good picture of the brain. He could get a good image of where that dark and the light matter was, and their theories as to how intelligence is related to that white matter in the gray matter. Next came functional MRIs, a big step forward, in which researchers were able not just to take a static picture of a brain, but to watch as the brain lit up in a pattern as people as subjects undertook the tasks they were given. So you could ask research subjects to do demanding or not demanding our mental exercises and watch what parts of the brain lit up as they did them. This has progressed further with increasingly sophisticated techniques such as the magneto-encephalogram (MEG), able to access regions of neuron activity dynamically every millisecond during the performance of a cognitive task.

Brain imaging has revealed some interesting differences among people. When given a cognitive problem, people with high measured intelligence show brain activity in different parts of the brain than average people. When men and women of equal measured ability are given the same cognitive problem, the two sexes seem to use different parts of their brains to solve them.

So that''s the overall story. People want to deny the reality of intelligence are now faced with the task of denying the reality of physical of the imaging of brains, I should mention. Also, the reaction time tests that have been being done for a century or more, and they are faced with the reality of it. Denying the genomics that suggest how intelligence is is compiled. In other words, they have to be. They have to be willfully blind in order not to see that intelligence is highly heritable.

With regard to the argument as to whether intelligence is relevant, intelligence has always been highly correlated with measures of real-world success – academic achievement, workplace achievement, and income just to name three. These are so obvious that as to be undeniable unless you''re a real zealot and work very hard not to believe it.

Haier expresses the concept that I have long known intuitively but didn''t have words for. Intelligence is not measured on a ratio scale. That''s important. Our weight and height are measured on a ratio scale. As to say that there something can weigh 0 pounds or can be a 0 inches tall. There is no zero on the intelligence scale. Intelligence measures relative performance among people. The standard is an IQ of 100, the average for a population. That average does not stay still. It is not average is not constant across time, and is certainly not constant across populations. It''s a moving target. One of the things that Haier hopes to do is to establish a ratio scale for measuring intelligence.

I''ll note that that offers that is not a total solution, although it will be a big plus. Haier measured it in a question of brain speed. They can measure that. So he can say that the clock speed of the brain help fast is a subject able to answer questions.

However, a lot of intelligence testing is a matter of can you solve the problem or not. Typical examples would be: can you multiply the given to two digit numbers together in your head and come up with the right answer? Some people can, some people simply cannot. Ever. The same goes for verbal intelligence. If a test asks, "what''s the relationship between a regatta and a fleet?" or "What''s the relationship between a regatta and a peleton?" some people who will never be able to answer the question. They simply don''t know the words, or if they know them. They simply can''t make the facilities syllogisms. So a lot of intelligence is not ratio scale. It is binary. Can they answer the question or not?

An intelligence test measures how many questions a subject is able to answer, but still not on a ratio scale. There is no assurance that the questions are commensurate, that they do the same thing. Psychometricians try very hard to make test items commensurate, to ensure that they measure the same thing, but each question is really a separate entity. It will never be possible to say that Dick is 50% smarter than John. Or 150. In fact, in areas where it might be measured, there will be some metrics by which somebody may be a thousand times smarter than somebody else. John Van Neumann would be a thousand times better than me at the multiplying together five digit numbers in his head. I might achieve one pair of numbers after many hours of laborious work. He could do an instant. The ratio scale doesn''t make sense for this. It''s binary. He could do it. I can''t. It is absolutely certain that brain scans would show totally different areas of his brain being active working the problem that would be for my brain.

As a companion to Haier''s book, I recommend Richard Plomin''s recent book "Blueprint." Plomin has been investigating the connection between genomics and intelligence, with little reference to measurement systems. The two books together provide a good understanding of the state-of-the-art in intelligence research.
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Bob Lewis
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An excellent survey of the research
Reviewed in the United States on December 15, 2019
Intelligence research is controversial. Anyone who has followed the field knows it, and the author of this book certainly doesn''t hide it. Instead, he acknowledges that the field is complicated but presents an overview of the current state of the research, pointing out... See more
Intelligence research is controversial. Anyone who has followed the field knows it, and the author of this book certainly doesn''t hide it. Instead, he acknowledges that the field is complicated but presents an overview of the current state of the research, pointing out where the evidence is conclusive, where it''s questionable, and where it''s non-existent. After decades of work, many questions remain, but the combination of psychometric, genetic, and brain imaging studies has shed considerable light on the structure of human intelligence. This book doesn''t go into great detail on all of these subjects but provides a moderately-deep survey of the neuroscience research on the topic.

I''ve long complained that one of the biggest problems in scientific writing is that the "actual" scientific writing (peer-reviewed journal articles) has become so dependent on advanced training that even professional scientists from slightly different disciplines struggle to make heads or tails of its content (thus hampering interdisciplinary collaboration) while even intelligent lay audiences stand no chance at all (thus hampering public understanding of cutting-edge science). Meanwhile, much of the "popular" scientific writing is produced by journalists who either don''t understand their subjects or dumb them down to the point of inaccuracy. This book seems to find a near-perfect compromise and I would dearly love to see much more work in its genre.

The ideal audience for this book seems to be the student of either psychology or neuroscience with an interest in intelligence research. The author makes no apologies for inclusion of a fair amount of semi-technical information, but also gently introduces the reader to many of these topics, making the work accessible to as broad an audience as is possible for such a work. By the time you finish reading, you''ll come away with a bird''s eye view of the current state of neuroscience research on intelligence, some interesting questions for future research, and a sense of the field''s development through history.

Nothing as complicated as the human brain can be thoroughly examined in only 200-some pages, but the reader will gain a more-than-passable understanding for non-professionals and a well-documented road map to further reading for students or professionals in the field.

Not only is this a work of academic interest, it''s also quite practical. Political discussions regarding education policy are ubiquitous and often, in the authors own words, rancorous. Though the author does make a couple of political observations (some of which I agree with and some of which I don''t) in the final couple of pages, this book isn''t a text on education policy. It does, however, provide the requisite scientific background necessary for a productive discussion of education policy. If we want to make people smarter, we need first to understand the biological reasons why some people are already smarter than others. It''s an open question, but this book helps to point us in the right direction.

Highly recommended.
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Vincent Archer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A very good and very short summary of the state of Intelligence research.
Reviewed in the United States on March 16, 2018
I think a summary of chapter 1 should be mandatory reading for everyone, as it clearly explains g (general intelligence), its relationship to all testing methods, and why it matters and is useful. You may be slightly lost with the rest (starting at chapter 3),... See more
I think a summary of chapter 1 should be mandatory reading for everyone, as it clearly explains g (general intelligence), its relationship to all testing methods, and why it matters and is useful.

You may be slightly lost with the rest (starting at chapter 3), but the beginning alone is worth the book.
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343Programs
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A broad overview of the state of the art
Reviewed in the United States on March 28, 2019
This is a good book for an overview of the modern science of intelligence. If you want to know where the science is now this is a good place to start. It lacks the interesting ruminations of books like the Synaptic Self and The New Executive Brain but is valuable... See more
This is a good book for an overview of the modern science of intelligence. If you want to know where the science is now this is a good place to start. It lacks the interesting ruminations of books like the Synaptic Self and The New Executive Brain but is valuable none-the-less.
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FrankP
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent book and very readable
Reviewed in the United States on July 12, 2019
Yes, it''s a very difficult subject, but the author''s writing style makes it easy to read and had me laughing at several points. The book covers a lot of territory in this field and nicely summarizes multiple research efforts. Lots of references for deep diving into related... See more
Yes, it''s a very difficult subject, but the author''s writing style makes it easy to read and had me laughing at several points. The book covers a lot of territory in this field and nicely summarizes multiple research efforts. Lots of references for deep diving into related subjects.
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kh
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Clearly written broad survey of intelligence research
Reviewed in the United States on October 14, 2017
Contains links to citations and materials for further reading. Complicated stuff very simply explained. Highly recommended reading for those interested in what neuroscience has to say about intelligence.
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DavidR
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Useful, well-written, approachable book on intelligence research.
Reviewed in the United States on September 17, 2017
I thought Dr. Haier did a superb job of distilling the state intelligence research into a very readable book. He gives a great overview of the field. The way he presents the evolution of theories as new imaging technology became available really helps to understand the... See more
I thought Dr. Haier did a superb job of distilling the state intelligence research into a very readable book. He gives a great overview of the field. The way he presents the evolution of theories as new imaging technology became available really helps to understand the research process, so an interesting new finding can be placed in a more comprehensive context and tempered by experience of how intelligence research tends to evolve. I greatly appreciated the beginning-of-chapter notes on what to look for and the end-of-chapter questions; they help to make clear when one has absorbed all the material and when one has not.
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Top reviews from other countries

Adam Carlton
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Practical overview of research on intelligence
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 26, 2018
This book is "Rich" Haier, Professor Emeritus in the Pediatric Neurology Division of the School of Medicine at the University of California, Irvine, writing to his students. He wants to tell them about the three-pronged nature of contemporary research into...See more
This book is "Rich" Haier, Professor Emeritus in the Pediatric Neurology Division of the School of Medicine at the University of California, Irvine, writing to his students. He wants to tell them about the three-pronged nature of contemporary research into intelligence: psychometric tests (delivering ''g''), neuro-imaging and genomics. Leveraging all three approaches, he comprehensively demolishes blank-slate ideas that intelligence doesn''t really differ between individuals, genders and/or ethnic groups, and shows that intelligence differences (as measured psychometrically or in life outcomes) have measurable correlates neuro-anatomically and genetically. Since higher IQ correlates positively with desirable life outcomes, he is a strong proponent of research which might lead to future IQ improvements, either through some kind of ''IQ pill'' or targeted allele-engineering. Haier is plainly an experimentalist, not a theoretician. He is happiest explaining the details of studies, neuro-imaging equipment and brain images: he''s almost too thorough. He is also good on the unexpected results: when men and women with identical (and high) mathematical abilities were scanned while solving advanced math problems they were equally successful - but the men used the spatial parts of their brain while the women were using verbal modules. While we are plainly in the middle of a technology-led revolution (well-described at an introductory level) it''s frustrating that the jury is still out on all the important questions. We don''t know what the brain is doing which distinguishes consciousness from unconsciousness; we don''t really know how the high-IQ brain differs in structure or function from the low-IQ brain although there are some suggestive ideas; we don''t know how to alter/improve IQ by any well-attested intervention. Perhaps this will change over the next few years. Given the stigma which still attaches to intelligence research in the West, perhaps we''ll have to wait for the Chinese to tell us.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A thorough, accessible and appropriately concise overview of a broad and fascinating literature.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 18, 2019
Dr. Haier’s overview of the research into intelligence over the past 150 years or so provide a great insight into one of the lesser known factors that influence our social interactions and professional hierarchies. Required knowledge would likely include a basic grasp of...See more
Dr. Haier’s overview of the research into intelligence over the past 150 years or so provide a great insight into one of the lesser known factors that influence our social interactions and professional hierarchies. Required knowledge would likely include a basic grasp of experimental and statistical methods and a rough comprehension of functional neuroanatomy. I’ve done a little informal reading on these topics and that was adequate in helping me understand this book. I enjoyed reading it and would advise people to watch Dr Haier’s contribution to ‘The Great Courses’- which is essentially a series of filmed presentations explaining the material in the book almost word-for-word, and is available (at the time of this review) on YouTube.
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Stephen Wilks
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fascinating review of the field
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 15, 2017
Fascinating review of the research in the field. Accessible to the non-neuroscientist, whilst delving into good detail on the key debates in the area.
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Robert Buck
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Latest research on the brains computer connections.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 16, 2021
The connectivity and efficiency of the brain and hence a good measurement of intelligence will soon be available to anybody who is willing to have their brain scanned. Some people will find this idea abhorrent, especially those on the left or the wokes!
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Abz
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 7, 2018
Excellent
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Course Match Cognitive Neuroscience; Cognitive Psychology; Cognition Cognitive Neuroscience; Memory and Learning; Cognition Developmental Psychology; Adolescence Cognitive Neuroscience; Adult Development and Aging; Gerontology Cognitive Neuroscience; Cognition; Neuropsychology, Brain and Behavior
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Description This unique book clearly explains genetic and neuroimaging research on intelligence and how neuroscience findings may lead to enhancing it. This book provides the only comprehensive and up-to-date treatment on the cognitive neuroscience of memory. Written by an award-winning developmental neuroscientist, this is a comprehensive and cutting-edge account of the latest research on the adolescent brain. Integrates a neuroscience approach to study aging. In addition to covering standard cognitive functions, it incorporates socioemotional abilities. Updated thoroughly, this comprehensive text highlights the most important issues in cognitive neuroscience, supported by clinical applications.

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