The 2021 New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised lowest Standard Version online sale

The 2021 New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised lowest Standard Version online sale

The 2021 New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised lowest Standard Version online sale
The 2021 New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha: New Revised lowest Standard Version online sale__front

Description

Product Description

For over 50 years students, professors, clergy, and general readers have relied on The New Oxford Annotated Bible as an unparalleled authority in Study Bibles. This fifth edition of the Annotated remains the best way to study and understand the Bible at home or in the classroom. This thoroughly revised and substantially updated edition contains the best scholarship informed by recent discoveries and anchored in the solid Study Bible tradition.

· Introductions and extensive annotations for each book by acknowledged experts in the field provide context and guidance.
· Introductory essays on major groups of biblical writings - Pentateuch, Prophets, Gospels, and other sections - give readers an overview that guides more intensive study.
· General essays on history, translation matters, different canons in use today, and issues of daily life in biblical times inform the reader of important aspects of biblical study.
· Maps and diagrams within the text contextualize where events took place and how to understand them.
· Color maps give readers the geographical orientation they need for understanding historical accounts throughout the Bible.
· Timelines, parallel texts, weights and measures, calendars, and other helpful tables help navigate the biblical world.
· An extensive glossary of technical terms demystifies the language of biblical scholarship.
· An index to the study materials eases the way to the quick location of information.

The New Oxford Annotated Bible, with twenty new essays and introductions and others--as well as annotations--fully revised, offers the reader flexibility for any learning style. Beginning with a specific passage or a significant concept, finding information for meditation, sermon preparation, or academic study is straightforward and intuitive.

A volume that users will want to keep for continued reference, The New Oxford Annotated Bible continues the Oxford University Press tradition of providing excellence in scholarship for the general reader. Generations of users attest to its status as the best one-volume Bible reference tool for any home, library, or classroom.

Review


"A huge wealth of material in a single volume.the assiduous reader will find here an invaluable library of biblical text and diverse scholarship." Philip S. Johnston, JSOT


" The Oxford Annotated Bible and its successors have established a rich tradition that has served both students and readers of the Bible. With the newly revised Fifth Edition readers are met with a significantly enhanced volume. Retaining the basic format and features of earlier editions, the Fifth Edition of the New Oxford Annotated Bible has enhanced the text with features that are sure to be deeply appreciated by its users." Dale E. Luffman, Association for Mormon Letters


About the Author


Michael Coogan is Lecturer on Old Testament/Hebrew Bible at Harvard Divinity School and Director of Publications for the Harvard Semitic Museum. He has also taught at Harvard University, Boston College, Wellesley College, Fordham University, and the University of Waterloo (Ontario), and has
participated in and directed archaeological excavations in Israel, Jordan, Cyprus, and Egypt. He is the author of Old Testament text books and The Old Testament: A Very Short Introduction.

Marc Z. Brettler is Bernice and Morton Lerner Professor in Judaic Studies at Duke University.

Carol Newsom is Charles Howard Candler Professor of Old Testament, Candler School of Theology, Emory University.

Pheme Perkins is Professor of Theology at Boston College.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Aitor
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A layman''s point of view.
Reviewed in the United States on July 19, 2018
***Updated Review: 18.Dec.2018**** [So far so good, I keep learning and growing.] BINDING (One big "Why" this new version was needed): This new version, at first glance does not seem to have changed drastically when I compared it to the 4th. I want to... See more
***Updated Review: 18.Dec.2018****
[So far so good, I keep learning and growing.]

BINDING (One big "Why" this new version was needed):
This new version, at first glance does not seem to have changed drastically when I compared it to the 4th. I want to point out that it''s binding has been reinforced to correct the major flaw the 4th had (it would rip from the spine; you could tell it was a badly constructed); Now, the glue binding has been sewn which has definitely improved it''s sturdiness. I''ve not gone through the whole of it, but most probably this was the chief reason for a new edition. I know how frustrating that is, mine (4th), ripped after two months in. But now the 5th has come!

CONTENT:
The introductory essays at the beginning of each book have remained the same,except for some minor editing that I''ve noticed so far. Comments at the foot of every page are marvellous. If you want a new perspective on every book that is an evidence-based critical analysis this is the bible for you. It provides different perspectives without diminishing the Bible''s credibility. That is precisely why I favour this study bible more than the Harper Collins Study Bible. A version in which the authors appallingly downgrade the Bible''s religious importance to a fictional book. Which, for me, it is a drawback. I do understand, this approach is used in Divinity schools; but the authors kept in mind that lay readers would seek and Oxford Bible in an attempt to better understand the Scriptures. And that, I liked.

AS A RESOURCE:
The Oxford''s Annotated Bible offers a historic/preterist view (one does not have to agree with all of provided content). Something I found highly informative was current and past theories as to why it is possible for books to have been edited or had multiple authors instead of the widely held beliefs taught in church. Or better put: the theological approach to the study of the Bible. BUT, is not done without disrespecting one''s beliefs. I feel many academic books do a fine job in that regard. It is an honest and serious approach to enhance the scope for the reader. My devotionals have thus become intellectual and spiritual experiences. I enjoy every contributor''s commentaries, because they put into context every book''s contemporary politics. The reader has a better grasp of the political background that may or may not influenced a book''s contents: some were destroyed and rewritten—edited too—over hundreds of years. The NRSV is a magnificent translation in itself. Now add Oxford''s reputation and deep academic tradition to it and voilà: That is how the The Oxford Annotated Bible was born.

BOTTOM LINE:
I highly recommend this study Bible. if you desire to nourish your thirst for knowledge, then, this will be a great resource for you.

Arrivederci!
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K
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent, but navigability could be improved
Reviewed in the United States on June 10, 2018
(This is about the kindle version!) ... Of course, the contents are, in general, excellent and substantial. This review is not about that. It''s about how this e-book does not take much advantage of the possibilities offered by the electronic format. EXECUTIVE... See more
(This is about the kindle version!) ... Of course, the contents are, in general, excellent and substantial. This review is not about that. It''s about how this e-book does not take much advantage of the possibilities offered by the electronic format.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: The main thing to get this for is the introductions, essays, notes (annotations), and the complete NRSV w/ apocrypha. But it can be very hard to use the kindle version as a true study Bible because citations and cross-references in the notes are not hyperlinked -- meaning that you would have to manually find the verses being cited or given as cross references, and finding a specific verse is time consuming because there are no chapter links within individual books. Etc. However, the introductions and notes are good.

RAMBLING, FULL-LENGTH VERSION: Navigability should be improved. Links should be added for all verse citations/cross references. A real table of contents with links for each book and book chapters should be added. Once you navigate to a book, there should at that point be a (hyperlinked) list of the book''s chapters, so you can touch (for example) "Chapter 12" and go straight to Chapter 12 (instead of having to manually go one page at a time to get there). This e-book, I think, really should be updated to take advantage of the electronic medium. As it is now, it''s nicely formatted, but it only very minimally takes advantage of the possibilities of the electronic format - the main issue is navigability.

The annotations are somewhat inconsistently implemented. Some verses you touch the verse number and a pane comes up in the bottom 1/3 of the screen with the commentary/note. Other verses, you touch the verse number, and then are taken to a page (like end notes). Some verse citations (all of them within the footnotes) are not hyperlinked. It would be extremely time consuming read through a book''s chapter, read the notes for that chapter, and then manually find the verses/cross references cited in the notes, and then go back to where you started reading from -- because of the lack of hyperlinks. But that kind of intense study reading, and going back and forth and following the cross-references, etc., is exactly what a study Bible like this is supposed to be for - if you want to do that, you may be happier getting the paper version of this.

Again - in the commentary/notes, cross-references and citations to other verses are NOT hyperlinked! (You would have to manually search for them.) OUP really should update this so that all verse citations and cross-references are hyperlinked! (Note: the kindle of the NABRE translation (ASIN: B0054SLCOQ) has this feature (all it''s notes/cross-references ARE hyperlinked - each and every one! the kindle version of that Bible really takes advantage of the electronic medium. It''s the best kindle Bible I''ve found. For $5.99 it''s a great deal. It''s a Catholic Bible, so includes most of the "apocrypha" and the notes/commentary are extensive and detailed.) Anyway, the NOAB 5th Ed could really use an update to make it a really functional electronic book: namely, all verse citations should be hyperlinked and the annotations should be implemented in a more uniform way.

I was actually pretty surprised about these two issues: (1) that verse references and cross references within the annotations do NOT have ANY hyperlinks, and (2) - not really as important - the inconsistent way in which verse annotations are implemented (some appear as a pane in bottom half of screen, others as end notes, others (infrequently) seem not to work, and for some verses you touch the verse number and it takes you to the endnotes and, somewhat confusingly, there is not always a specific note for that verse there.

Anyway, it''s still very nice to have this in a portable (kindle) format, but it takes some time to get used to how the annotations can be accessed, and navigation could be VERY much improved (e.g., add a real table of contents with links, add chapter links, add links for verse citations and cross-references in the notes).

Re lack of chapter links: As the book is now, if you want to read, for example, John 3:16, you would have to find John in the list of books at the front, and then manually keep tapping to reach "John" in that list (going all the way from Genesis), and then once at the start of John (there is no chapter list there), so you would have to manually go one page at a time until you get to the 3rd chapter. This isn''t always so bad, especially in shorter books, but what if you''re trying to get to the 48th Chapter in Isaiah? Find Isaiah in the list of books, then touch that, then manually go one page at a time until you reach chapter 48?! I can''t believe OUP didn''t provide better navigation - at least for chapters.

As it is now, this is - for me - a little arduous to navigate through sometimes. In a way, that has a certain charm: this kindle e-book will not surrender forth all of its riches without some effort on the reader''s part! But - this is an e-book. It is SUPPOSED TO BE easy to navigate! OUP really should be updated to take advantage of and utilize the possibilities, presently mostly latent, offered by the electronic format. Perhaps the 6th Edition will fix these problems or OUP will make an update to this (5th) Edition?

Again, I would love to see an update of this with all verse references/cross-references hyperlinked, like in the NABRE noted above, and with improved navigation, with a real table of contents including links for individual chapters within books. Also the verse citations in the introductions/essays should also be hyperlinked. Sometimes they are, sometimes they aren''t. Would be nice to see an update to this kindle volume.

(Again, re the NABRE: It stands for New American Bible Revised Edition - it''s the Bible used for liturgy in the Roman Catholic Church in the US (you can take a look at the text and notes for free on the USCCB web site, to see what it''s like) - it contains most of the "apocrypha" you would find in this 5th Ed. NOAB, plus, in my opinion, useful notes and commentary, from a mainstream Catholic viewpoint, and very useful (and ALWAYS hyperlinked) citations and cross-references to really help you see how various parts of the Bible are related (and quickly jump around by pressing the links and then the back (<-) button), it''s especially useful to see/understand connections between the Old Testament and New Testament. I think anyone interested in a kindle Bible should get a copy of it - see ASIN: B0054SLCOQ.)

ALSO -- If you don''t really need the annotations in this 5th Ed. NOAB, another NRSV with all the same apocrypha is available from HarperOne (ASIN: B003YUCE98). It is a very nicely done kindle book, with excellent navigation, links where you would expect them, fully functional table of contents, chapter links at the start of books, etc. And it also has the nice feature of chapter/section headings (descriptive titles of what follows, e.g., "The Parable of the Sower" at the start of Mark, ch. 4), unlike - it seems - all Bibles produced by OUP.
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Justin RTop Contributor: Photography
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Paperback better than Hardcover
Reviewed in the United States on October 29, 2019
Paperback review: I bought the hardcover version first, see below. The paperback edition is much much better. I have the 4th edition and it’s the same quality, nice sturdy but flexible cover. I’ve included a few photos to show the minor differences. Hard... See more
Paperback review:
I bought the hardcover version first, see below. The paperback edition is much much better. I have the 4th edition and it’s the same quality, nice sturdy but flexible cover. I’ve included a few photos to show the minor differences.

Hard cover review:
This is my 1st hardcover bible, I’ve always had paperback and leather. The content itself is not in question, only the physical quality of the book. The hardcover has very very thin pages, pages easily wrinkled or folded over if you’re not careful. The covers themselves are just okay. I understand the price point, but I would have paid $10 more for a better quality. I have the paperback of the 4th edition and I think it holds up to use and abuse much better. After a few days of using the hardcover, I returned it for the paperback.
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Alyssa
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great Bible for accessible but thorough study--thin pages
Reviewed in the United States on July 7, 2018
I really like this translation of the Bible and also enjoy all the notes printed on the bottom half of each page. this is excellent for studying. I compared quite a few NRSV Bibles trying to decide which to get. I wanted to get something good for studying with thorough... See more
I really like this translation of the Bible and also enjoy all the notes printed on the bottom half of each page. this is excellent for studying. I compared quite a few NRSV Bibles trying to decide which to get. I wanted to get something good for studying with thorough notes. Personally I liked this Bible better than the Harper Collins Study Bible because these notes felt more accessible and more useful for my studying. I don''t have any formal religious education; I am merely interested in understanding my faith better through studying the Bible. I feel this Bible suited this purpose very well. I took off one star because the pages are so thin it is sometimes a bit hard to read, as you are trying to read one line and can see a good amount of the backside of the page through it. I understand they are trying to cram an extreme amount of writing into this book and don''t want it to be too thick, but personally this seemed a little too thin since it was to the point of being a little hard for me to read. (And I have better-than-average vision.)
55 people found this helpful
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RioLion
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Problematic
Reviewed in the United States on September 11, 2018
There is simply no way one can select a specific book, chapter and verse of the bible. For instance, if you wanted to read Isaiah 55:11, you can select Isaiah 55:11, you have start at chapter 1 and then continue to page all the way to chapter 55. This is far too... See more
There is simply no way one can select a specific book, chapter and verse of the bible. For instance, if you wanted to read Isaiah 55:11, you can select Isaiah 55:11, you have start at chapter 1 and then continue to page all the way to chapter 55. This is far too time consuming.
43 people found this helpful
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Tiger Lewis
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Best Modern Translation with Scholarly Notes and Translation Notation
Reviewed in the United States on May 28, 2019
This Bible likely is not for everyone due to its reliance on the scholarly evidence and verifications of translations from the surviving source texts, translated and notated, by a consensus of scholars. It embraces a more scholarly approach to the Bible. Due to difficulties... See more
This Bible likely is not for everyone due to its reliance on the scholarly evidence and verifications of translations from the surviving source texts, translated and notated, by a consensus of scholars. It embraces a more scholarly approach to the Bible. Due to difficulties present in all the surviving holy texts and translations from those sources, scholarship is employed to arrive at a consensus; often returning to the Septuagint and the Masoretic texts, including too the Qumran cave materials; where problems arise multiple translations and interpretations are presented and explained. The translation NSRV is an English translation of multi-denominational research published in 1989 by the National Council of Churches. The Council of Churches is an ecumenical body in the United States consists of scholars from more than 50 faith groups. The mandate of the translation was ''As literal as possible'' meaning a translation as close to the original texts as possible. This is a full translation and includes books of the standard Protestant canon as well as the Deuterocanonical books traditionally used in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches. As such, the book is a great piece of scholarly Bible research that aims to educate Jewish, Christian, and Islamic readers and students as well as agnostic and atheist ones. Highly recommended. AA+++
27 people found this helpful
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andem
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Primitive navigation makes this one useless
Reviewed in the United States on April 9, 2019
I don’t use this bible at all because navigation is so primitive that simply finding a particular scripture passage is tedious and slow. I really wanted to like and use it but can never get past the irritation of getting to where I want to start. For example, once you... See more
I don’t use this bible at all because navigation is so primitive that simply finding a particular scripture passage is tedious and slow. I really wanted to like and use it but can never get past the irritation of getting to where I want to start. For example, once you manage to find the book you want, you must churn through page-by-page of introduction, etc. even to get to chapter 1 of the book. Then it’s page-by-page to get to the passage you want. And I really mean swipe-by-swipe because even the normal click and fly-through function doesn’t work with this book. Utterly useless! I would return it except that I see that other reviewers clearly warned me. Since I ignored the warnings, I guess I deserve what I got.
15 people found this helpful
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bc
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Glad to have a Kindle version available even if the navigation is less than ideal
Reviewed in the United States on June 18, 2018
Excellent study bible. The navigation on the Kindle version could be improved, but I have found it much more useful since discovering that tapping the chapter or verse numbers will pull up the footnote box allowing quicker access to the annotations. Perhaps I am still... See more
Excellent study bible. The navigation on the Kindle version could be improved, but I have found it much more useful since discovering that tapping the chapter or verse numbers will pull up the footnote box allowing quicker access to the annotations. Perhaps I am still missing something but there does not appear to be a quick way to navigate a list of chapters or verses for the individual books. Despite the less than perfect navigation I am glad to have it on my Kindle reader.
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Top reviews from other countries

Anselm
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
THE PROPER KINDLE VERSION HAS ARRIVED!!!!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 24, 2018
My, how this grizzled old atheist''s heart did leap when he checked - for the umpteenth time - to see if that useless "print replica" version of the New Oxford Annotated Bible (NOAB) had been superseded by one that has actually been formatted for Kindle. There''s no...See more
My, how this grizzled old atheist''s heart did leap when he checked - for the umpteenth time - to see if that useless "print replica" version of the New Oxford Annotated Bible (NOAB) had been superseded by one that has actually been formatted for Kindle. There''s no way I was going to waste money on a purported Kindle version that serves the need to constantly zap back and forth between text and commentary less well than the massive print version does. And finally - here it is! Warning: if you''re buying a Kindle version, DO NOT get the "Print replica" one that, as I speak, costs about £5 more for the privilege of getting next to zero functionality. Amazon should really take that one off and just leave the this Kindle version and the print one. I note K''s review on Amazon.com to the effect that this Kindle version''s navigability could be improved. I''m sure they''re right - in the excellent series of concluding essays, for example, and the in-book annotations, the referenced Bible passages aren''t linked. It''s also clunky to navigate your way to a particular verse, chapter or passage within a book. You just have to scroll. But hey ho - what''s on offer is light years in advance of the previous PDF masquerading as a "Kindle" version. It''ll do me for now, and if a new, even better, Kindle version is produced, I expect it''ll be automatically updated on my Kindle in Amazon''s usual helpful fashion. I''ve been discovering far more about the Bible since I became an atheist than I ever did when I was a fundamentalist Christian. I''m sick at heart when my former fundie peers pervert reason and their own minds "reconciling" the Bible''s obviously irreconcilable contradictions in ways that would be laughed out of court if they were applied to any other corpus of literature, or produce grotesque readings of passages whose meanings are often plain enough but that contradict what they want to believe, claiming the "inspiration of the Holy Spirit" as if it provided access to some kind of interpretive Holy of Holies rather than failing to constitute even the most patently miserable of excuses for their blatantly warped interpretations. And atheist Bible-bashing can sometimes be not much more helpful. Yes, I know the Genesis creation and flood accounts are absurdly at odds with Buddha knows how many well-established branches of knowledge, that the Exodus myth is... well, a myth, and that the divinely mandated genocide of the Hebrew Bible and the condemnation of most of earth''s population to everlasting hellfire of the Christian one is no less than sick and deranged, although in their defence this bashing is made necessary by literalist nonsense.the soundness of whose empirical and logical basis is in inverse proportion to the frequency of its repetition. The Bible, along with every other "sacred" tome ever written, as well as all notions of the "divine" themselves, is a product of the individual and corporate human mind, and it would be great to have an edition of the most influential of these writings that treated it as such. It''s in that respect that this massive tome is such a powerful tool. It proceeds on the assumption that humans wrote this collection from human motives. This is a "reasonable" approach. It''s the same one we use to treat Homer''s "Iliad" and the works of Shakespeare. or for that matter any work of fiction or non-fiction. "Goddidit" provides no more explanation for what the Bible says than it does for any secular literature. It''s worse than irrelevant: it''s profoundly damaging to a quest for any kind of truth or knowledge. It''s not the beginning of investigation - it''s the end of it. After that comes the mere black hole of "faith", one of the most heinous conceptions our diseased imaginations have ever produced. As part of its assumption, the NOAB as near as neutrally summarises the present state of scholarship, religious and secular, on all things biblical. The series of essays in which it does so consists of introductions to sections of the Bible and to individual books, as well as a raft of concluding essays on all aspects of the Bible generically (Hebrew and Christian, separately and together). These essays are both substantial enough in themselves and of sufficient quantity to warrant separate publication in their own right as a collection. At last I can find out what the relevant experts are saying - or NOT saying - on a particular topic, and thus to find out what we know and (just as importantly) don''t know about such things as the process by which the canon now known as the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh was composed, compiled, edited and redacted - i.e. how the text grew out of the societies that produced it. The essays are written for the general reader, not for specialists, and as such they make available to anyone who''s interested not only the most recent scholarship but (again, just as importantly) the methods scholars have used and use to arrive at their conclusions. The supplementary tables, charts, diagrams and maps are extremely helpful, although the latter, being in colour, don''t come across well on a Kindle. There''s also a really helpful bibliography of some of the editions of, and the most basic literature on, the various topics discussed. This humanist approach also applies to the New Revised Standard Version (NRSV), the text used by the NOAB. Praise be to Allah that all the blather in so many "Christian" English editions, in which the translators express the hope that the results of their labours might convince the reader to believe what they believe, is absent. (I suspect that such material usually means that some ideologically-driven mistranslation is going on, which is what the New International Version has been criticised for.) No, the introduction ("To the Reader") to the NRSV simply outlines the process by which it was carried out and the principles used, as if it were a translation of The Song of Roland. How refreshing. At last I feel the scales lifting from my eyes and the light of reason and common sense dawning. And a couple of the NOAB''s essays aren''t afraid to call out errors in the NRSV translation, either. Then, of course, there are the annotations to the actual texts themselves. All those in the NRSV have been preserved, with the Oxford edition ones being presented separately from them, the former being accessed by clicking on the superscript letters, the latter by clicking on the verse numbers. I haven''t started exploring these yet, but from a quick perusal I expect the more fulsome Oxford ones to amount to separate essays in themselves for each book. A final note: the ecumenical NRSV, and consequently the NOAB, includes ALL the apocrypha used by the Roman Catholic and Orthodox (i.e. Greek and Slavonic) churches. You will therefore find such works as 3 and 4 Maccabees and Psalm 151 as well as the apocrypha accepted only by the Roman Catholics that you sometimes find in Bibles "with Apocrypha".
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Kindle Customer
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Ref Kindle version
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 12, 2019
This is my favourite translation of the Bible and also my preferred study Bible but the kindle edition is what I am referring to in this review. The thing about it that in my view makes it almost unusable is the lack of ease when it comes to trying to find a passage. Having...See more
This is my favourite translation of the Bible and also my preferred study Bible but the kindle edition is what I am referring to in this review. The thing about it that in my view makes it almost unusable is the lack of ease when it comes to trying to find a passage. Having to go to the beginning of the book and then proceed by page flipping until the required passage is not good enough. When many other Bibles can have links to each chapter within a book this one should be able to so as well. If this was updated my review would become a 5 star one
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Truckey
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Review of poor and odd Kindle functionality
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 11, 2021
As others have noted, while this fifth edition of the NOAB is a big improvement over the fourth edition in being more than just a pdf copy (and so can be read on a Kindle e-ink device as well as in the Kindle app), it has a significant flaw, making that improvement of less...See more
As others have noted, while this fifth edition of the NOAB is a big improvement over the fourth edition in being more than just a pdf copy (and so can be read on a Kindle e-ink device as well as in the Kindle app), it has a significant flaw, making that improvement of less value than it should have been. The contents do not provide any way of navigating to individual chapters or verses of a book in the Bible. The best you can do is to navigate to the introductory note to the relevant book. Then you need to scroll forward through the note and start scrolling onwards through the text of the book to find the particular chapter and verse you are wanting to read. Admittedly by using the multipage view (as shown in my fourth photo) you can get through page turning nine pages at a time but that''s hardly ideal. It is baffling why OUP have not created a sub-contents menu to provide this access as the ESV Study Bible and Harper Collins Study Bible do. The other irritating oddity with the Kindle version is the big change in font size between the text of the Bible and the hyperlinked notes to verses of the Bible, shown in the attached photos. The notes appear by default in a font size that is about 11 if you used that for the text but a normal reading size for the text would be 4 or 5. You can reduce the size of the notes once you have opened them - they seem to open in font size 5 - but the smallest you can get them to is a font size 1 which is just about OK but that approximates to a font size 9 for the Bible text which is larger than necessary and so takes more page space that is ideal. The result is that you always have to reduce the font size to a minimum when opening any note and then increase the font size of the text of the Bible when you go back to the text because on the font size setting you''ve selected for the notes, the text is now far too small to be comfortable to read. Am I doing something wrong here? Has anyone else with the Kindle version had this problem. As you can see the fonts for the text and notes seem to have been deliberately set up in different sizes for some reason. This is a pity because the NOAB is an excellent resource and the Kindle edition is very competitively priced. This failure really does make the Kindle version an unnecessary pain to use. In addition, my "trial" copy of the Kindle version did not seem to include any of the maps at the end of the Bible that are offered in the physical copy, despite the Kindle''s contents page saying that the maps followed the "end of the text". I have returned the full Kindle version that I bought and have bought a hard copy of the NOAB in its place - which is very nicely produced and much easier to read with good sized (bigger font) text and reasonably (smaller sized) notes - but it would have been much nicer and preferable for me to have been able to read the NOAB (and easily carry it around with me) in a usable Kindle format. I''m still in two minds about buying the Kindle version, despite these formatting problems because of the convenience of having such an excellent study Bible with me at all times.
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S. J. Williams
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A very good study Bible IF YOU CAN READ THE FOOTNOTES AND ESSAYS.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 13, 2021
I bought this for the broad minded ecumenical approach of the study elements, the essays etc rather than the specific translation. (Im happiest with the NKJV to be honest.) I am not a Christian and haven’t been since at 17 I fled the, in my view, narrow minded ‘God wrote...See more
I bought this for the broad minded ecumenical approach of the study elements, the essays etc rather than the specific translation. (Im happiest with the NKJV to be honest.) I am not a Christian and haven’t been since at 17 I fled the, in my view, narrow minded ‘God wrote this, all unbelievers are to be damned,’ together with all sorts of other (again in my view) nonsense like creationism, and right wing socio-political perspectives. But I think the bible a hugely important text, as I do, say, the Divine Comedy, king Lear, The Brothers Karamatzov, to name but a few. And reading Marilynne Robinson’s brilliant Gilead sequence has prompted me to revisit and dig deep. The bible text here is in a font which is very readable, better than many Bible editions, but the study materials, footnotes and essays are in a desperately tiny font. I have managed to read some essays (and found them excellent) with a magnifying glass, but it’s an exhausting process. I want to read them, but frankly the exhaustion of struggling with the font size makes the study element something I confess is for me borderline unusable. Such a pity. Maybe I should try the kindle version!
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Edward Nickell
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Poor kindle version of good content
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 24, 2019
If you want to get to a chapter near the end of a book, you will have to scroll through page by page to reach it! It seems pretty basic to have an index of chapters at the start of each book, come on, get it fixed!!!
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