Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate popular Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That 2021 Happened outlet online sale

Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate popular Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That 2021 Happened outlet online sale

Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate popular Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That 2021 Happened outlet online sale
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#1 New York Times Bestseller

“Funny and smart as hell” (Bill Gates), Allie Brosh’s Hyperbole and a Half showcases her unique voice, leaping wit, and her ability to capture complex emotions with deceptively simple illustrations.

FROM THE PUBLISHER:
Every time Allie Brosh posts something new on her hugely popular blog Hyperbole and a Half the internet rejoices.

This full-color, beautifully illustrated edition features more than fifty percent new content, with ten never-before-seen essays and one wholly revised and expanded piece as well as classics from the website like, “The God of Cake,” “Dogs Don’t Understand Basic Concepts Like Moving,” and her astonishing, “Adventures in Depression,” and “Depression Part Two,” which have been hailed as some of the most insightful meditations on the disease ever written.

Brosh’s debut marks the launch of a major new American humorist who will surely make even the biggest scrooge or snob laugh. We dare you not to.

FROM THE AUTHOR:
This is a book I wrote. Because I wrote it, I had to figure out what to put on the back cover to explain what it is. I tried to write a long, third-person summary that would imply how great the book is and also sound vaguely authoritative—like maybe someone who isn’t me wrote it—but I soon discovered that I’m not sneaky enough to pull it off convincingly. So I decided to just make a list of things that are in the book:

Pictures
Words
Stories about things that happened to me
Stories about things that happened to other people because of me
Eight billion dollars*
Stories about dogs
The secret to eternal happiness*

*These are lies. Perhaps I have underestimated my sneakiness!

Amazon.com Review

An Amazon Best Book of the Month, November 2013: Who among us has not, in moments that sometimes bleed through years, even decades, felt weird, desperate, and absurd--wishing we could turn all the lamest, most shameful episodes in our lives into hilarious illustrated anecdotes? If youre one of the millions hanging on Allie Brosh''s every blog post, you already know you''ll love Hyperbole and a Half in book form, especially since half its hyperboles are new. If you''re suspicious of books because you live in a world of the INTERNET FOREVER, this is where you make an exception. If you just stumbled across Brosh and can''t yet grasp the allure of a Web comic illustrated by rudimentary MS Paint figures, believe the hype. Brosh has a genius for allowing us to channel her weird childhood and the fits and starts of her adulthood through the manic eyes, gaping mouths, and stick-like arms in the panels that masterfully advance her stories, and she delivers her relentless commentary with deadpan hilarity. Neurosis has rarely been so relatable and entertaining. --Mari Malcolm

Guest Review of Hyperbole and a Half

By Bill Gates

Bill Gates is a technologist, business leader, and philanthropist. He grew up in Seattle, Washington, with an amazing and supportive family who encouraged his interest in computers at an early age. He dropped out of college to start Microsoft with his childhood friend Paul Allen. He married Melinda French in 1994 and they have three children. Today, Bill and Melinda Gates co-chair the charitable foundation bearing their names and are working together to give their wealth back to society. This review originally appeared on Bill’s personal blog the Gates Notes on May 19th, 2015.

Some of the books I’ve recommended as summer reads really aren’t. They’re long nonfiction books that might look a little out of place beside the pool or on the beach.

But Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things that Happened , by Allie Brosh, is an honest-to-goodness summer read. You will rip through it in three hours, tops. But you’ll wish it went on longer, because it’s funny and smart as hell. I must have interrupted Melinda a dozen times to read to her passages that made me laugh out loud.

The book consists of brief vignettes and comic (in both senses of the word) drawings about Brosh’s young life (she’s in her late 20s). It’s based on her wildly popular website.

Brosh has quietly earned a big following even though, as her official bio puts it, she “lives as a recluse in her bedroom in Bend, Oregon.” The adventures she recounts are mostly inside her head, where we hear and see the kind of inner thoughts most of us are too timid to let out in public. Despite her book’s title, Brosh’s stories feel incredibly—and sometimes brutally—real.

I don’t mean to suggest that giving an outlet to our often-despicable me is a novel form of humor, but she is really good at it. Her timing and tone are consistently spot on. And so is her artwork. I’m amazed at how expressive and effective her intentionally crude drawings are.

Some of Brosh’s stories are funny without being particularly meaningful, such as her tales about her two dogs and their humorously illogical inner thoughts. Here’s a typical snippet: “To the simple dog, throwing up was like some magical power that she never knew she possessed—the ability to create infinite food. I was less excited about the discovery because it turned my dog into a horrible, vomit-making perpetual-motion machine.”

And here’s a typical illustration:

But her best stuff is the deep stuff, especially the chapters about her battles with severe depression. There is a lot of self-revelation here but no self-pity. She brings the same wit to this subject as she does to her stories about her dogs—even if it makes the reader more likely to tear up than crack up.

Here’s a typical snippet that follows a riff about feeling suicidal and not quite knowing how to let loved ones know about these feelings:

I suspect that anyone who has experienced depression would get a lot out of reading this book. The mental illness she describes is profoundly isolating: “When you have to spend every social interaction consciously manipulating your face into shapes that are only approximately the right ones, alienating people is inevitable.” It must be empowering for those who have struggled with depression to read this book, see themselves, and know they’re far from alone.

It might be even more valuable for those who have a friend, colleague, or family member who has experienced depression. Hyperbole and a Half gave me a new appreciation for what a depressed person is feeling and not feeling, and what’s helpful and not helpful. Here’s a good example: “People want to help. So they try harder to make you feel hopeful…. You explain it again, hoping they’ll try a less hope-centric approach, but re-explaining your total inability to experience joy inevitably sounds kind of negative, like maybe you WANT to be depressed. So the positivity starts coming out in a spray—a giant, desperate happiness sprinkler pointed directly at your face.”

I get why Brosh has become so popular. While she self-deprecatingly depicts herself in words and art as an odd outsider, we can all relate to her struggles. Rather than laughing at her, you laugh with her. It is no hyperbole to say I love her approach—looking, listening, and describing with the observational skills of a scientist, the creativity of an artist, and the wit of a comedian.

Review

"I must have interrupted Melinda a dozen times to read to her passages that made me laugh out loud. . . . The adventures she recounts are mostly inside her head, where we hear and see the kind of inner thoughts most of us are too timid to let out in public. Despite her book’s title, Brosh’s stories feel incredibly—and sometimes brutally—real. . . . It is no hyperbole to say I love her approach—looking, listening, and describing with the observational skills of a scientist, the creativity of an artist, and the wit of a comedian." -- Bill Gates

"Imagine if David Sedaris could draw . . . Enchanting." ― People (4 stars, People Pick)

Winner of the Goodreads Choice Award for Best Humor Book of the Year
An NPR Best Book of the Year
A Library Journal Best Book of the Year, Memoirs -- .

“I would gladly pay to sit in a room full of people reading this book, merely to share the laughter.” -- Philadelphia Inquirer

"My wife, who rarely reads a book published after 1910 and who is difficult to make laugh, wept with pleasure while reading these comic illustrated essays from Ms. Brosh, who runs a popular web comic and blog. I had to find out what the fuss was about. The subjects run from light (cakes, dogs) to dark (the author’s own severe depression), and they foreground offbeat feeling and real intellect. Ms. Brosh’s inquisitive mind won me over, too.” -- Dwight Garner ― New York Times

“In a culture that encourages people to carry mental illness as a secret burden . . . Brosh''s bracing honesty is a gift.” -- Chicago Tribune

“Brosh captures humanity at its simultaneous worst and best with a razor wit that allows us to laugh at even our darkest of selves.” -- The Advocate (Baton Rouge)

"Will make you laugh until you sob, even when Brosh describes her struggle with depression." ― Entertainment Weekly

"This is the BOOK OF THE YEAR." -- Elizabeth Gilbert

“One of the best things I’ve ever read in my life.” -- Marc Maron

"This book made me laugh, cry, and leak. It was honest, poignant, and ridiculously silly in all the best ways and I''m better for having read it. Plus, doggies!" -- Jenny Lawson, The Bloggess and author of Let''s Pretend This Never Happened

"An Internet-era treasure, an unexpected wonder of the 21st century." -- Cory Doctorow, BoingBoing.com

“Brosh is a connoisseur of the human condition.” -- Kirkus Reviews

"Brosh is an evocative writer who bares her foibles and shortcomings, from childhood to her present life, with a lack of vanity and a sense of catharsis that is palpable." -- Publishers Weekly

“Get this for the smart people who appreciate humor in your life, and they won''t be disappointed." -- io9.com

The whole blog is inspired.” -- Andrew Sullivan, The Daily Dish (The Atlantic)

“Anyone seeking an accessible look at someone suffering from depression or some really delightful dog drawings need search no further.” -- Time Out New York

"Both singular and familiar—the popularity of Brosh''s blog and her absurd, exuberant voice meant that she started  a lot of memes you might have come across— Hyperbole and a Half is a very funny reminder that it''s normal to not have your shit together, and to know that it''s okay to ask for help." ― GQ

About the Author

Allie Brosh is the author of the #1  New York Times bestsellers Solutions and Other Problems and  Hyperbole and a Half, which was named the Goodreads Choice Award Winner for Best Humor Book of the Year. Brosh has also given herself many prestigious awards, including “fanciest horse drawing” and “most likely to succeed.” Find out more at HyperboleandaHalf.blogspot.com.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
7,223 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Silje
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not really funny...but good.
Reviewed in the United States on August 13, 2018
I don''t like leaving a bad review, so this isn''t really a bad review. This is more a bad review to the people pitching this book to buyers as the funniest book of the year. I was looking for a funny book, because I was feeling low and needed to laugh. I bought the book... See more
I don''t like leaving a bad review, so this isn''t really a bad review. This is more a bad review to the people pitching this book to buyers as the funniest book of the year.
I was looking for a funny book, because I was feeling low and needed to laugh. I bought the book because it said it was incredibly funny, and people were in bits over it. However, I realised quickly that this book, as childlike as the drawings were, and as funny as the narrative was meant to be, was a story about a woman who has had deep and serious struggles in life. The part about the dogs might be a bit amusing, but on a whole this is not ''ha ha'' funny. It addresses mental illness in a way that most people might be able to relate, or at least understand what is going on. One episode spelled out in clear text what depression really is. It is a well written book, and I did finish it in one sitting. I loved the seriousness of it, the honesty behind it, the bravery of telling that story, but it was not a funny book.
153 people found this helpful
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Scott Slemmons
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Allie Brosh''s Genius Cartoons
Reviewed in the United States on July 21, 2017
Some of you may be familiar with Allie Brosh''s much beloved website, also called "Hyperbole & a Half." It featured lots of amazing tales and amazing artwork. She specializes in pants-wettingly funny essays, accompanied by her equally hilarious semi-primitive artwork... See more
Some of you may be familiar with Allie Brosh''s much beloved website, also called "Hyperbole & a Half." It featured lots of amazing tales and amazing artwork. She specializes in pants-wettingly funny essays, accompanied by her equally hilarious semi-primitive artwork — and the occasional extremely sad story, which often ends up being fairly funny, too. She has a great grasp of the way comedy can be found in tragedy.

She wrote this book, some of it taken from her website, and some of it all new material. There are a few old favorites, like “The God of Cake” and “The Party,” and there are quite a few that are completely new — the full story of her hopelessly crazy Helper Dog, Allie’s letters from (and to) her 10-year-old self, getting lost in the woods with her mom and sister, and plenty more.

It’s not all silly stuff, though. The book also includes her lengthy essay on what it’s like to be depressed, as well as her thoughts on perception and identity — and the nature of thought itself. But even then, Allie has a strong sense of the way life’s most serious moments still end up being surreal and unexpected — so they’re still pretty silly. This is in no way a bad thing.

Let’s talk about the art first. It looks really goofy and crude. No human looks like that, with the stick arms and cone hair. But it ain’t crude at all. Yeah, it’s designed to look like it was done in MSPaint — but Brosh spends a lot of time tweaking the art to make sure it looks right. And it’s got a lot of sophistication hidden behind the primitive exterior — there’s a lot of emotion and unexpected detail. If she’s making the art in MSPaint — well, she’s really good at making art in MSPaint, ain’t she?

The book is very funny. You will find stories in here that will make you laugh ’til you need new underwear. But her essays on depression are some of the most heart-breaking things you’ll ever read — and also the most insightful and educational. I feel like I have a much greater understanding of what an absolute hell it must be to go through that, and I know now not to say a lot of the things I used to say. Her “dead fish” analogy should be required reading for anyone who has friends or family who are depressed.

If you love amazing humor and goofball cartoons, you should get this book. If you like a little seriousness with your comedy, you should get this book.
71 people found this helpful
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Ana Mardoll
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
You Need This Book
Reviewed in the United States on September 13, 2017
Hyperbole and a Half / B00BSB2AE4 If I could purchase this book for literally every human I know, I would. The book is funny, sure, and it''s easy enough to see that from the free material on Allie''s website. Her drawing style is awesome, her storytelling is... See more
Hyperbole and a Half / B00BSB2AE4

If I could purchase this book for literally every human I know, I would. The book is funny, sure, and it''s easy enough to see that from the free material on Allie''s website. Her drawing style is awesome, her storytelling is hilarious, and her sense of humanity is funny and poignant all at once. There''s funny material and stories in here that you haven''t seen before and that alone is worth the cost of admission.

But what is really special about this book is the raw humanity Allie brings to the page. She talks beautifully about depression in a way that resonates deeply with me. The essays about how she beats herself up for not being a truly good, pure, perfectly-motivated altruistic person hit so close to home for me. She talks about feeling like a terrible human being because she''s motivated by selfish reasons like "don''t do a bad thing because it will make me a bad person" or "be nice because I want people to like me" or "follow this convention to avoid social consequences". I know those feels--the feeling that everyone else is good but you''re a dirty faker because you''re doing "good" things for the "wrong" reasons. Reading Allie''s words made me feel less alone and a little less hard on myself.

This book is good and you will laugh and probably cry.

~ Ana Mardoll
48 people found this helpful
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Anomaly
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Somewhat Dated But Still Entertaining & Insightful
Reviewed in the United States on September 30, 2020
I was a huge fan of Hyperbole and A Half, the blog, back when the only internet connection I had was 40kbps dialup (on a good day), coming from a laptop with a duct taped case, flickering screen, two missing keys, and a USB dongle modem to replace the original which got... See more
I was a huge fan of Hyperbole and A Half, the blog, back when the only internet connection I had was 40kbps dialup (on a good day), coming from a laptop with a duct taped case, flickering screen, two missing keys, and a USB dongle modem to replace the original which got fried by lightning. Back then, I would wait a small eternity for each image to load and lean in, squinting at the dying screen, just to laugh at the entertaining and relatable content. Back then, I couldn''t afford the book, and as with most meme-like things it faded to the back of my mind leaving only the "ALL the things!" meme in its place.

At some point between then and now, my best friend related a story from this very book - one of her favourite books of all time - to me in order to explain that I wasn''t alone in how I handled my depression and how frustrating I found others'' responses to it. In the story, Allie (the author) explains that the empty lack of joy caused by depression is akin to having a dead fish. Everyone keeps telling her to just try not having dead fish or reassuring her that someday she''ll have not-dead fish, completely ignoring that she is upset that her fish are dead and refusing to acknowledge that they cannot just be magically resurrected. All she wants is for someone to just acknowledge that the fish are dead and understand that having dead fish sucks. That story resonated with me, and for roughly a year, I used the metaphor to let my friend know when I was feeling depressed but not looking for magic fixes - just comforting acknowledgment.

Eventually, it faded from mind, replaced by more modern references or direct honesty. Then Allie''s second book happened recently. I pre-ordered it on that very same best friend''s urging and absolutely loved the experience. Allie''s art is so charmingly expressive even in its simplicity and she writes about things which make me feel far less alone in how I experience the world.

I was excited to have everything I remembered loving about the blog in a modern book. When I related this to my friend, she bought me this book and I was overjoyed to have more of the same - I hadn''t even remembered this existed!

So, here I am, having just finished reading Hyperbole and A Half, the ebook rather than the blog, on a lovely flagship phone with a beautiful screen... in a format which makes me squint and lean in to read the pictures, on a mediocre wifi connection, through a router which was purchased to replace one that got fried by lightning.

Some things never change. Or perhaps, they shift a bit in ways which remain achingly familiar. The relatability of the fish story is one such thing... and the urge to meme "ALL the things!" once again is also quite strong.

That said, however, I wish I had read the books in order. This one is slightly dated in the language choices and in my opinion Allie has grown significantly as an author in her newer book, Solutions And Other Problems, which made it feel a bit like I was reading a regression in this order. The relatability and entertainment values are still very much there, but some stories drag too long and others are very clearly written from an early-2010s perspective.

For example, in a story about discovering that one of her dogs is developmentally challenged, Allie refers to the dog''s apparent lack of mental acuity by saying her dog might be r*t**ded [censored for Amazon; written fully in the book]. I couldn''t help but cringe at this, even though she was using the term in a literal, pseudo-medical sort of assessment and this was written before we as a society came to the conclusion that the word needs to be avoided for all its harmful associations. It only happens in a single chapter, after which she refers to this dog as "the simple dog," but even that feels a little unpleasant.

Everything else, however - even when the stories drag on longer than they should - is great. There are interesting, entertaining, heartbreaking, fascinating, relatable, and hilarious things in relatively proportionate doses. Allie''s narrative voice is as conversational and smooth as listening to a good friend talk to you at a social gathering, creating a sense of camaraderie despite the obvious barrier created by being total strangers. Even the stories about "the simple dog" and the other dog adopted to be her companion are fun, especially when the dynamic between them is explored.

As with the sequel book, I found the mental health issues extremely relatable. Much like Allie describes in this book, I also beat myself up internally every time life with depression makes simple tasks difficult... and then get even more demotivated by the self hatred, creating a perpetual cycle of uselessness. I imagine many people with clinical depression can relate.

Additionally, I enjoyed the bits about self image and having intrusive thoughts. Here, Allie explains how she struggles with self-loathing because she wants to do bad things (like kick sand at people or make fun of people) but chooses not to because she wants to be a better person. For her, it''s difficult to reconcile the realization that she has the potential to be a bad person with the effort she expends to make sure she''s not. It''s a refreshingly honest exploration of human nature, self image, and the existential crises caused by the places where those things don''t quite properly align. It''s also the source of my favourite quote in the book: "...so, you''d rather know the truth and be mad?" / "No. I want the truth to be different." That feels oddly timeless and appropriate to many situations, especially this year.

Overall, I think this book deserves 4.5 stars, but we''re still stuck in a world without half-star ratings on Amazon, so I''m going to round it down to properly indicate that I feel it''s not quite as good as the sequel which I gave five stars. I enjoyed it and I''m sad that it''s over because I want so much more from this author. The format and voice are so unique, I''m not sure I''ll be able to find anything else of the sort - at least not easily.

But, hey, at least I feel a little less alone in how I experience the world, now. And I both got some good laughs and a chance to enjoy my best friend''s favourite book. I''d say that''s very much a win.
9 people found this helpful
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abby
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Laugh Out Loud (For Real!) Funny
Reviewed in the United States on March 13, 2017
I am an ugly laugher. This is something I didn''t know about myself until I read this book. This is the type of book that''s not merely amusing or funny in the way of smart satire. No, Brosh''s brand of humorous life observation, coupled with her rough but charming... See more
I am an ugly laugher. This is something I didn''t know about myself until I read this book. This is the type of book that''s not merely amusing or funny in the way of smart satire. No, Brosh''s brand of humorous life observation, coupled with her rough but charming illustrations, will have you clutching your side, desperate for air. My husband banned me from reading this book at night because my hysterics woke him up, and I got a lecture about REM cycles and proper adult bedtimes (incidentally, my husband is a fully-functioning grown up and not the target audience for this book). Despite the author''s questionable life choice to be a dog person, I felt like I could relate to everything in this book. And I also found it empowering in a way. Being a superstar adult is not for everyone, and whether or not it was the author''s intentions, I feel a little better about it after reading this book.
25 people found this helpful
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Jen STop Contributor: Pets
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Book To Cherish, Especially if You Suffer From Depression
Reviewed in the United States on February 9, 2017
Oh, Allie, how I adore you! Allie Brosh, like many of us, works hard to manage her depression disorder. Her wit (for those of us) is highly entertaining, self-deprecating in a humorous way, and gives the reader someone with whom to identify. We all have our dreadful days,... See more
Oh, Allie, how I adore you! Allie Brosh, like many of us, works hard to manage her depression disorder. Her wit (for those of us) is highly entertaining, self-deprecating in a humorous way, and gives the reader someone with whom to identify. We all have our dreadful days, Allie included, but her humor lends a lightness to some common frustrations. I open the book and read it at random, often finding myself howling with laughter. I bought one for my friend as well, so now we get to share our hearty laughs with each other over the phone. Allie''s simple drawings are silly and funny, too. She does a fantastic job of taking harder life experiences (and episodes of depression), puts them into perspective, and keeps her readers laughing at the craziness of it all. She makes me laugh every time I open the book, and I can easily identify with her! Bravo, Ms. Brosh!​
15 people found this helpful
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KarToon12
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A blogger''s collection of tales about the ups and downs of being human
Reviewed in the United States on September 10, 2021
I''ve been slowly making my way through a long list of books recommended to me by a librarian friend of mine. Next up on the list was this quirky little volume that stems from a highly popular blog that I''ve heard about, but admittedly have never read. With so many people... See more
I''ve been slowly making my way through a long list of books recommended to me by a librarian friend of mine. Next up on the list was this quirky little volume that stems from a highly popular blog that I''ve heard about, but admittedly have never read. With so many people giving the blog and this book such rave reviews, I figured I would start with this compilation to see if the rest of the blog would be worth checking out. in the end, I would say yes, though some of the stories aren''t as big a laugh riot as you may think.

Allie Brosh has become one of the most popular and famous bloggers on the internet, thanks to her "Hyperbole and a Half" series. With colorful, simple, stick figure-like drawings to help tell the stories, we''re taken through a series of misadventures, mishaps, weird observations, and other random chaos from her life. From less-than-intelligent dogs, to a bottle of hot sauce causing a decades-long misunderstanding, to a scary goose breaking into her house, each tale is filled with bittersweet confessions, impulses that we all might have had but would never dare admit to having, and life advice that would otherwise sound insane, but makes sense in context. But as with everything, life isn''t all fun and games, and in-between the weirdness and chaos, a serious and frank narrative begins to emerge about her battles with mental illness, and how she comes out the other side with a smile....or at least her sanity relatively intact.

The artwork/mini-comics that go along with the writing help tell the stories and, in some cases, enhance them. The art itself looks like crude, MS Paint doodles, though honestly, these basic and child-like scribbles often get across certain feelings that no other "better" art style could convey. Although, it makes me wonder if the art really is the author''s skill level, or if the "crude" style is done on purpose, because there ARE moments of dramatic angles, decent lighting and shading, and I can easily tell what everything is supposed to be (animals in particular---her dogs are cute and charmingly hilarious to look at).

The chapters alternate between the wacky innocence of childhood and dealing with the insanity that is adulthood. Some of my favorites (and arguably the funniest to me) were the past-centered stories, or the animal related ones, such as "Warning Signs", "The Simple Dog", "The Helper Dog", "Dinosaur (The Goose Story)", and my personal favorite, "Lost in the Woods".

But it''s not all sunshine and rainbows, as we get periodic time outs in which the author discusses her struggles with depression, self-doubt, the image she projects to everyone, and her criteria for being a good person. The way she explains her inner, mental fight is both brave of her to even talk about, and eye-opening, with descriptions that paint the perfect picture of what it''s like when your emotions are out of whack, or have left you altogether. For people going through this same struggle, her words can provide confirmation and solidarity. And for those, like me, who are on the outside looking in, it can help us to better understand and comfort our loved ones who are fighting inner demons without spouting empty platitudes at them that may sound nice, but are actually making it worse. I have no doubt that, in the right hands, this book could save some lives.

I would actually give this book three stars, as most of the stories weren''t rip-roaringly hilarious; they were mostly just chuckle-worthy to me. But then again, comedy is subjective, so it''ll all depend on what you personally find funny. But I gave it an extra star, as the author has a way with explaining complex and/or just outright near-unexplainable emotions. In particular, the chapters revolving around her battle with depression should seriously be inducted into the self-help books of every doctor''s office everywhere. Now I''m off to see what the rest of her blog has to offer.
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Dr Pepper
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Depressing
Reviewed in the United States on May 20, 2020
Endlessly hopeless lonely self preoccupied person reflecting on her life. This is based on reading the first 20 pages. Decided not to read further, even if this was recommended by a famous, very smart person. It reminds me of Sartre and absurd literature.
6 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Astrid
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic humourful look at a very dark subject: depression. Accurate portrayal.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 9, 2017
I read this book in pretty much one sitting, and continue to go back to it to have a laugh and feel... less alone. There were more than several moments/pages/drawings where I found myself laughing out loud, and then thinking, "yeah, actually, I''m like that, too!" -...See more
I read this book in pretty much one sitting, and continue to go back to it to have a laugh and feel... less alone. There were more than several moments/pages/drawings where I found myself laughing out loud, and then thinking, "yeah, actually, I''m like that, too!" - having suffered from depression, a lot of people (especially those who have never experienced it) do not understand that it''s not simply a bad day or feeling a bit crap. Allie Brosh hits the nail on the head with her experiences - some of which mirror my own. I''ve read a few reviews and whatnot that say that this book is one of the most accurate portrayals of depression - I''d be inclined to agree. The illustrations add a bit of humour to an otherwise dark, horrible mental health issue. This book is fantastic, thoroughly enjoyed it, so much so that even though I borrowed it from the local library, I shall be buying a copy of my own. I look forward to the next book. Bravo to Allie Brosh for making something as horrible as depression actually a thoroughly entertaining (and accurate) read.
12 people found this helpful
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Heather @ Random Redheaded Ramblings
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Immense!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 7, 2015
So after reading the fabulous Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson I was perusing her website and on her blog roll she listed the website Hyperbole and a Half. Intrigued by the name I found myself on the site looking at a cute drawing of a girl with what looked like a unicorns...See more
So after reading the fabulous Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson I was perusing her website and on her blog roll she listed the website Hyperbole and a Half. Intrigued by the name I found myself on the site looking at a cute drawing of a girl with what looked like a unicorns horn on her head. It had me hooked at unicorn. I discovered that Hyperbole and Half was the creation of Allie Brosh and the cute drawings are created using good old Paint on her computer. The drawings she has created are reasonably childish looking but literally every picture oozes with humour, her comic alter ego has hundreds of facial expressions, my favourite would probably be this one.. Anyway needless to say I found myself on Amazon looking to see if there was any Hyperbole related goodies, hell yes there was and a couple of clicks later I became the proud owner of this book. Basically the book takes best bits from the blog along with some new stories and mashes them together to create a fricking brilliant book/comic/funny riotous read. First of all the book looks good, it is page after page of colourful comic and secondly those comics are accompanied by the wonderfully witty prose of Allie Brosh as she tells us about her childhood, her love of dogs and more stories about dogs, she does love dogs, really loves dogs. Her two dogs Simple dog and Helper dog feature prominently throughout, they are adorable and as I read about them I totally pictured my furry fuzzball doing the same things. But as well as being hysterically pee yourself funny, Allie also touches on her dealings with depression but she does it with the aid of her brilliant comics that make a not so pleasant subject a bit easier to deal with. This is just a great book, it is colourful, funny, full of dogs, crazy facial expressions, bad language and killer geese. It is by no means highly polished but it totally hits the spot. Did I also mention how big it is, it is like 300 plus pages. I freaking love it! If you are need of a good laugh then this will definitely hit the spot!
7 people found this helpful
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sadgirl
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fantastic funny book, buy it now!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 25, 2017
Love it! Funny, funny, funny book. It is in small-ish chapters so I am "rationing" it as it is so good I want it to last. As described, it is the weirdest situations and circumstances that you could not make up if you tried. Love the two odd dogs featured as well....See more
Love it! Funny, funny, funny book. It is in small-ish chapters so I am "rationing" it as it is so good I want it to last. As described, it is the weirdest situations and circumstances that you could not make up if you tried. Love the two odd dogs featured as well. Highly enjoyable. I was feeling very down when I bought this and it has really cheered me up. Curious cartoon drawings but they just add to the quirky nature of the stories. I want to give Allie sensible advice on her dogs but realistically just stop being serious, suspend disbelief, and ride along with her. And enjoy it! I will definitely buy more books of hers. Buy this book, it''s guaranteed to make you laugh, promise.
3 people found this helpful
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Victoria May
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Just as hilarious as the original blog
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 1, 2020
I''ve been following Allie for years at her blog Hyperbole and a Half, and was very excited when she announced her first book. I preordered this and although I knew some of the content would be lifted straight from the blog posts, there would also be plenty of new material....See more
I''ve been following Allie for years at her blog Hyperbole and a Half, and was very excited when she announced her first book. I preordered this and although I knew some of the content would be lifted straight from the blog posts, there would also be plenty of new material. And all of it is classic Allie - hilarious and heartwarming and emotional. I''m especially glad that she included her posts about Depression because they''re some of the most apt descriptions of what it''s like to struggle with your mental health, and I''ve sent those posts to people over the years by way of explaining the way it feels to people who haven''t had that struggle themselves. I will continue to support Allie in her writing, and I would recommend this book to absolutely anybody. Her style is all her own and you really need to just dive in and give it a read - but if you''re on the fence, definitely check out her blog because the style of the chapters in this book is the same as how she wrote over there for years prior to becoming a bestselling author.
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a random busybody
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Story of Life, Madness and the Downright Bizarre...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 12, 2015
For those of you unaware, this book is partially a collected set of stories from the popular blog, Hyperbole and a Half ([...]), a website that hosts many random stories, some funny, some poignant and some just very strange revolving around incidents that has happened at...See more
For those of you unaware, this book is partially a collected set of stories from the popular blog, Hyperbole and a Half ([...]), a website that hosts many random stories, some funny, some poignant and some just very strange revolving around incidents that has happened at various points in the author''s life. I say "partially" because there are also several new stories that were written specifically for the book. Now I should point out a couple of caveats here: 1) If the cover does not provide enough hints already, the stories in the book are illustrated by artwork deliberately drawn in a crude computer generated style, deliberately reminiscent of simple image editing programs like Microsoft Paint.If this puts you off, this book may not be for you. 2) As I mentioned, some of the stories do come from the website, albeit with slightly updated artwork. If this bothers you for any reason, you can just read the website instead. For the rest of you not bothered by those two caveats, what you will find are several chapters of amusing stories from throughout Ms. Brosh''s life. Allow her to recount why she was concerned about a letter her 10 year old self wrote to her future self, marvel at how much chaos and untold psychological torture Allie causes to her parents with a mimicking parrot toy and experience sheer terror as Allie and her boyfriend end up experiencing first hand how dangerous a goose can actually be (And why a Jurassic Park film comes to mind when this happens). It isn''t all just whacky random humour though as Allie gives us some personal experience of her battles with depression and anxiety in her own sometimes darkly humourous fashion. If you are looking for some deep, philosophical tome on the nature of human existence, a literary masterpiece that makes every other masterpiece before it look like an amateur novella or some greatly detailed instructional guide to dealing with major psychological trauma, this is possibly *not* the book for you. However if on the other hand you just want a collection of random, sidesplittingly hilarious stories dotted with some more touching stories about mental issues and identity, this might just be up your street. To sum up, a good read that isn''t too serious that can brighten up a bad day.
3 people found this helpful
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